Mathon V-16

Joseph G Per

Mathon V-16

by Joseph G Per » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00

Givenm all the recent talk about creating V-12's and such from existing
motors, an article in this months (dec) Kit Car Illustrated caught my
eye. Al Mathon has recently begun producing V-16's, using dual 350's. I
have imported the full text of the article below, but the pictures are
something to behold. Even when they tell you *exactly* where the cases
were cut, you can't see any kind of seam. This motor is HUGE. 9 bearings,
custom intake manifold (dual carbs) etc... Well, I'll stop yakking and
just show the article :)

------------BEGIN OCR FEED----------------

    It's a stretched V-8, more like two
    engines back to back. You walk around
    it in puzzlement. There are 16 wires
    stretching out from the distributor and
    the headers have eight pipes to a side. A
    V-16??? Can't be! The last one was
    probably made by Cadillac in the
    thirties. Jaguar doesn't go beyond a
    V-12. Double vision Chevy? No doubt
    about it!

    We might as well admit it, there's
    been no other engine like it. It is a
    father-and-son project, the brainchild
    of Al Mathon Sr. and his son Al Mathon
    Jr. Both are master welders and owners
    of High Speed Salvage Company in
    Central Islip, New York, specializing in
    repairing blown-up race blocks and
    heads.

    At a time when the Japanese were not
    yet thinking of sending us cars, Al Sr.
    was rebuilding combat aircraft and
    upon his return from the South Pacific,
    set up a large shop for welding engines
    and cylinder heads. Al Mathon Jr. has
    done industrial welding, taught welding
    and worked on bridges. With this type
    of background, it's no surprise their
    hobby project would take many exotic
    turns.

    The goal of this project was a street
    rod type engine with an uncanny
    amount of torque, all within streetable
    rpm range. Meeting that goal, they have
    successfully produced a double length
    Chevy V-16. The 16 pipes
    out do a Duesenberg any day of the
    week, and the network of ignition
    wiring doesn't leave a moment of
    doubt. Now do a little bit of simple
    arithmetic Two 350 cubic-inch Chevy
    small-blocks added end-to-end total up
    to 700 cubic-inches.

           SMOOTHNESS

    Loads of power, you bet! But as a
    side benefit, the V-16 idles like silk.
    When you come to a stop-light, the
    silence is deafening, totally quiet, no
    shake, no rumpety-rump-rump. Instead
    of eight power pulses, one each 90
    degrees of crank rotation, you get 16
    pulses at 45 degree intervals. From the
    driver's seat you experience quiet
    rocker action do to the extra power
    overlap between the cylinders.

    The big engine was built with a near
    stock cam and modest ports, but the
    sheer numbers of cylinders give huge
    gains of usable torque-without a huge
    fuel mileage penalty. You can go places
    without breaking the bank, but it's hard
    to beat the temptation to dip into all 16
    cylinders.

          WELDING TIME

    Twin-engine dragsters with two V8s
    have been around for a long time. The
    beauty of this engine, and its challenge,
    was to create one single monolithic
    block, fully welded, with 100 percent
    penetration. From the outside, the new
    block looks just like a Chevy original.
    There are no welds to be seen and every
    place the block was cut (at the bosses).
    In fact, the block looks just like a
    factory casting.

    The blocks are cut precisely to gain a
    consistent gap all around, and
    continuous bevels ensure full weld
    penetration. After cutting with a band
    saw, a trip to a big mill removed the
    back of the bell housing, on the front
    block and the timing case area on the
    rear one. With the welding completed,
    there are continuous water jackets left
    at all cylinders.

    The cuts are not made straight across.
    For instance, the main bearing sticks
    out ahead of the other cut lines. The
    Mathons teamed up with engineer
    Harry Strower in designing the new
    block, as well as coming up with
    some of the production details. The new crankshaft is shorter  
    overall than two Chevy cranks end-to-end, which helps increase  
    torsional stiffness. And the water jacket spacing between  
    cylinders remains consistent throughout, making none of the  
    cylinders siamesed.

    Included in the total package are four engine mounts instead of  
    just two, so when installed, the load is spread over a larger  
    portion of the frame.

                            BLOCK WELDING

    Cast iron is a great material, stable, strong, easy to machine and  
    helps the engine run quieter by damping out sounds. The  problem
    is welding it. Put too much heat at any one point and it  cracks.
    Try to lay a bead over a crack and it develops more  cracks.
    Complete your weld, and while it cools and shrinks,  you hear a
    soft pop as it cracks again. You don't get into these  problems
    when welding steel, which is ductile and malleable,  but you do
    with cast iron. High Speed Salvage has made a  career out of
    welding cast iron and learning how to handle it, so  it doesn't
    crack.

    When they're done, you can't even see where the weld was  
    done. They solved the problems by fixturing the parts, preheating  
    them, welding with special cast iron rod, and doing all the little  
    things that count. They can build up bolt bosses, add ribs and  
    webs, and produce a finish that looks more stock than the  
    original. Later, the casting is ready for machining and stronger  
    than new.

                   HEADS UP

    It takes four V-8 cylinders to make two of the new V-16 heads.  
    The back of one head and the front of another are cut
    and beveled to ensure full weld
    penetration, just as on a broken block.
    The two heads are then positioned so
    accurately that the head bolts thread
    directly into the block without any need
    to machine holes. Also, there are clear
    passageways for proper cooling. At the
    junction where the heads are welded,
    bosses have been built up and shaped
    like the originals.

    The first block used standard Chevy
    head castings, but later engines will be
    equipped with Bill Mitchell-prepared,
    World Product cast iron cylinder
    heads, that have better strength and
    breathing capacity. These heads, out of
    the box, make more power than ported
    factory Chevy heads.

            MACHINING

    Any welding causes some distortion,
    but here, amazingly little metal had to
    be removed to straighten out the block
    and heads. Speed Equipment
    Corporation in Bensalem,
    Pennsylvania, re-machined the rails,
    decked the block and bored the mains.
    They also machined the rear seal area.

    In the first engine, the crank formed
    an amazing display of welding
    craftsmanship. It took two people to
    weld simultaneously, with the rear
    crank positioned at exactly 45 degrees
    to the first one. Alternating the firing
    order between the front and rear block
    gained even power pulse spacing and
    the ultimate V-16 smoothness.

    The new cranks will all be 4340
    billets, machined from solid stock, but
    still the same journal layout. The
    original cam was formed from two
    sections coupled by a sleeve and fully
    proved itself on the dyno. Just like the
    crank, the new cam will be a one piece
    billet.

         INTAKE MANIFOLD

    A quick and easy shortcut would have
    been to machine and fit a pair of intake
    manifolds, but this would not have been
    the High Speed Salvage style. Instead,
    they cut and fitted the front manifold to
    eliminate the distributor hole and then
    proceeded to do matching cuts at the
    front of the rear manifold. Instead of
    trying to bolt the sections of the new
    manifold to
    the cylinder heads and weld them in place, the Mathons designed a
    complete aluminum fixture that positions the pieces and takes into
    consideration the expansion and contraction rates during and after
    the welding. The top of the intake manifold is boxed, so you now
    have a 2x4 intake manifold with two Edelbrock 625-cfm
    carburetors.

                    SIXTEEN
                     SPARKS

    In a total throwback to the days of old, 16 wires lead from a
    double-sized distributor cap. The distributor is built by magneto
    wizard, Bob Wyman, of Mallory. He machined and balanced the
    rotor for this distributor. The stainless steel wire supports were
    fabricated by High Speed Salvage.

    Cory, from United Machine in Central Islip, CNC machined the
    cap from a two-inch block of Lexan. To increase spark jumping
    resistance, there is a 1.5-inch space between adjacent spark tower
    terminals. Brass posts are pressed and epoxied into the Lexan,
    then machined.

                    DYNO TIME

    The proof is in the pudding for the new engine: in store for it was
    a trip to the Bill Mitchell Hard Core Racing Products  dyno. There,
    Frank Cerasuolo proceeded to test the engine on a Stuska dyno with
    a Dee pack instrumentation computer. The  dyno specs on the first
    motor featured 624 ft.lbs. of torque at 3300 rpm and 485 hp at
    4400 rpm-with all stock Chevy components! The new, upgraded
    engines are expected to produce I closer to 800 hp on pump gas.

     V-16s FOR SALE!

     The new V-16 engines are now in production! They feature I a
    one-piece 4340 billet crank and cam, modified World Products
    heads, new 350cid blocks,
...

read more »

Jim Harv

Mathon V-16

by Jim Harv » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00


If anyone is interested in seeing this engine, I have a photo of it
online at;
http://www.wp.com/HarveyRacing

Look for the KOOK'S Headers ad near the top of the page and you will
see a link to the Mathon V16

Enjoy

Jim Harvey


http://www.wp.com/HarveyRacing

Steven J Orl

Mathon V-16

by Steven J Orl » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00




>>Givenm all the recent talk about creating V-12's and such from existing
>>motors, an article in this months (dec) Kit Car Illustrated caught my
>>eye. Al Mathon has recently begun producing V-16's, using dual 350's. I
>>have imported the full text of the article below, but the pictures are
>>something to behold. Even when they tell you *exactly* where the cases
>>were cut, you can't see any kind of seam. This motor is HUGE. 9 bearings,
>>custom intake manifold (dual carbs) etc... Well, I'll stop yakking and
>>just show the article :)

>If anyone is interested in seeing this engine, I have a photo of it
>online at;
>http://www.wp.com/HarveyRacing

I just took a look at this.  W-O-W!  What an engine!   I didn't
catch the article posted earlier, but would anyone mind reposting
what the price / power output of these monsters is?   how about
RPM limits?

The only thing I have to say is that it would look a lot better
with four four barrels than just two.

I wonder if the intake is split in the middle?

Steve

GARDOG

Mathon V-16

by GARDOG » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00

What can you fit that in???????????
Jim Harv

Mathon V-16

by Jim Harv » Tue, 05 Dec 1995 04:00:00


No Steve, the manifold is one piece. The engine is just like a v8,
only is is 16 cylinders. It is an impressive piece of engineering to
say the least, but Al has been doing this kind of work since Jesus was
a boy, so this is his showcase piece.

Jim Harvey


http://www.wp.com/HarveyRacing

f..

Mathon V-16

by f.. » Tue, 05 Dec 1995 04:00:00






>>>Givenm all the recent talk about creating V-12's and such from existing
>>>motors, an article in this months (dec) Kit Car Illustrated caught my
>>>eye. Al Mathon has recently begun producing V-16's, using dual 350's. I
>>>    ...

Mathon had one of these engines in his booth at the Atlantic City, NJ, show
back in February but we all thought it was some kind of stunt to promote his
*** welding services - which themselves are impressive.  This engine
must be truly awesome.


Gary Anders

Mathon V-16

by Gary Anders » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00



--
I  would love to slip two of these into my boat.
Anyone know how much they cost?
Gary Anderson